UNISON UCLH Branch

Recovery From Accessory Navicular Bone Removal

Recovery From Accessory Navicular Bone Removal

Overview
The accessory navicular is an extra piece of bone or cartilage just above the arch on the inside of the foot. It sits next to the navicular tarsal, which gives it its name, where the posterior tibial tendon attaches to the bone before continuing to the underside of the arch. The little bone is a congenital anomaly, you are born with it. If the extra tissue doesn?t cause any problems, you may never know it is there. You can, however, develop the painful condition called accessory navicular syndrome. This occurs when the extra bone or the posterior tibial tendon surrounding it becomes irritated. Trauma from a sprain, friction from footwear, and overuse can all inflame the tissues.

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Causes
This How we can increase our height? result from any of the following. Trauma, as in a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the extra bone. Excessive activity or overuse. Many people with accessory navicular syndrome also have flat feet (fallen arches). Having a flat foot puts more strain on the posterior tibial tendon, which can produce inflammation or irritation of the accessory navicular.

Symptoms
It?s common for any symptoms to present during adolescence, when bones are maturing, though problems may not occur until adulthood. You may notice a bony prominence on the inner side of the midfoot. There may or may not be redness and swelling around this bump, especially if it rubs against footwear. You may be prone to blisters or sores in the area. Pain generally involves a vague ache or throbbing in the midfoot and arch as well, especially when you?re active. Many people with this syndrome develop flat feet, too, which can create additional strain in the foot.

Diagnosis
Usually, you will only need an X-ray to determine the size or type of the accessory navicular bone or the amount of medial navicular tuberosity hypertrophy. Be cognizant of stress fractures which may be duplicated as a hairline fracture or increased calcification. When treating children, always look for avascular necrosis of the navicular (Kohler?s disease). An X-ray of this condition will reveal a flattening of the navicular along with increased bone density.

Non Surgical Treatment
Using PRP treatments, orthotics, proper running shoes and physical therapy should do the trick. No long recovery, no long down time. My runners and athletes are usually back to their sport pain free within a month. The key is eliminating the syndrome, not the bone (or cartilage).

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Surgical Treatment
Once the navicular inflammation has lessened it is not necessary to perform surgery unless the foot becomes progressively flatter or continues to be painful. For these children, surgery can completely correct the problem by removing the accessory navicular bone and tightening up the posterior tibial tendon that attaches to the navicular bone. The strength of this tendon is integral to the success of this surgery as well as the arch of the foot. Following surgery the child is able to begin walking on the foot (in a cast) at approximately two weeks. The cast is worn for an additional four weeks. A small soft ankle support brace is then put into the shoe and worn with activities and exercise for a further two months.
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